Monthly Archives: December 2016

Is Italian Boating Recovering? – Courtesy of Boat and Boats Magazine

How’ s Italian boating? The great boat shows’ season has just finished and it’s time to take stock. To do that, we can use “Boating in Numbers“,the traditional report issued by Ucina and Edison every year.

We already told you some weeks ago that signs are encouraging and operators start to be moderately optimistic. But let’s see some essential numbers.

Here are the main indicators which tell the Italian boating’s trend between 2014 and 2015.

Overall turnover 2.90 billion euros (+ 17.1%)
Domestic production (Italy) : 0.55 billion euros (+13.1%)
Italian market: 0.95 billion euros (+ 21.3%)
Real operators 18.130 (+ 3.0%)
Contribution to GDP 1,75‰ ( + 19.0%)

So, positive numbers, especially as concerns the growing trend (and the first data of 2016, compared to 2015, seem to confirm them with a remarkable increase in the overall turnover, according to what said by Carla de Maria, president of Ucina, at the end of Genoa Boat Show) after a flat trend between 2012 and 2013 and a terrible crisis since 2009.

The main contribution comes from yards, which generate over the half of the sector’s turnover (55%), followed by accessories (29%), engines (9%), refitting, reparations and garaging (7%).

As regards the geographical allocation of turnover, 65% comes from foreign markets, 19% from the national market while 16% comes from importations.

One among the most encouraging factors is that the Italian market has contributed to the overall turnover with 950 million euros, marking a +21.3% than 2014 and reversing the negative trend of the last few years.

One of the best sectors concerns sailing boats (55,192,000 euros as global market) which registered a remarkable + 73%, even though over 40% comes from importations.

According to UCINA, the real workers in the sector are 16,750 (they were 16,400 last year), almost the half of whom are employed in the production and importation of new units. External workers are almost 2000 (1,800 in 2014) and they generally work for an average period of about 9 months, while over 65% of them are employed for more than 11 months a year.

Finally, Italians confirm to love motorboats: 80.5 % of the vessels registered are motorboats, 19.3 % are sailing boats while 0.2 % is represented by recreational ships (more than 24 m long).

If you would like a quote on boat insurance, click here.

For full article and source, click here

Three Keys to Make Docking Easier – by Boating Magazine

Turning Circle
Turning circle is the amount of space your boat requires to complete a turn.

The Importance: Knowing the turning circle is helpful whether you “dead-end” in a marina fairway or you encounter a current that’s running strong at the fuel dock.

The Details: Boats with props aft of the transom turn wider than boats having props forward of the transom.

The Zen: Be attentive to how sharply your boat turns at various speeds. Note the distance between your boat and “landmarks” like pilings, bow pulpits and raised outboards. Do this especially in situations where you have the procedure down cold. With each repetition you are engraving your boat’s turning circle on the tablet your inner captain uses for direction. With time, you’ll know the turning circle at all speeds intuitively.

Carry
This is how far your boat coasts, and with how much force, once you shift into neutral.

The Importance: Familiarity with carry is imperative to using current, wind and throttle.

The Details: Carry will vary with underwater form, propeller diameter and windage. A deeper boat, taller boat or boats with bigger wheels generally carry farther when placed in neutral.

The Zen: Carry, Grasshopper, varies as an exponent of boat speed and with the speed of the wind and the current. Pay attention to all three while docking. Note the speed and direction of the variables affecting carry. I suggest monitoring engine rpm rather than boat speed for this purpose. Do so, and hopefully you’ll avoid a need to rev the engines wide open in reverse gear to prevent a collision.

Kick
Kick is the direction and amount of sideways movement imparted to the stern when you shift an engine into gear.

The Importance: Since stopping is a primary component of docking, failure to be cognizant of kick results in problems when reverse thrust is applied while docking.

The Details: A turning propeller induces a sideways “moment” or force, called propeller torque. The effect of prop torque on any given boat is that boat’s “kick.” Kick varies with rpm applied and the direction of the prop’s rotation. Rudder or gear case position can enhance or diminish kick’s effect.

The Zen: While docking, hone your focus on the rudder/drive/gear case position and the engine’s rpm before you shift. Shift into neutral before making a change to the rudder. Practice keeping the rudder/drive/engine centered, and soak in the effect that changes in prop rotation (gear) and speed (rpm) have upon your vessel. Osmosis can be a great teaching tool. Allow your inner captain to accept it.

Quick Tip: Crew moving to one side to help causes the boat to list and thus handle differently.

Kick
Kick is the direction and amount of sideways movement imparted to the stern when you shift an engine into gear.

The Importance: Since stopping is a primary component of docking, failure to be cognizant of kick results in problems when reverse thrust is applied while docking.

The Details: A turning propeller induces a sideways “moment” or force, called propeller torque. The effect of prop torque on any given boat is that boat’s “kick.” Kick varies with rpm applied and the direction of the prop’s rotation. Rudder or gear case position can enhance or diminish kick’s effect.

The Zen: While docking, hone your focus on the rudder/drive/gear case position and the engine’s rpm before you shift. Shift into neutral before making a change to the rudder. Practice keeping the rudder/drive/engine centered, and soak in the effect that changes in prop rotation (gear) and speed (rpm) have upon your vessel. Osmosis can be a great teaching tool. Allow your inner captain to accept it.

Quick Tip: Crew moving to one side to help causes the boat to list and thus handle differently.

If you would like a quote on boat insurance, click here.

For full article and source, click here